Museums

“Hamilton: The Exhibition” Is (Almost) Here

Rendering by David Korins/Courtesy of “Hamilton: The Exhibition”

In case you’ve been sleeping under a rock since 2016, you know how endlessly epic the fascination with the musical Hamilton has been. Still, three years into its Chicago residency (one of only two U.S. homes to the fantastical production), folks line up down the block for shows, and tickets sell out faster than paczki on Fat Tuesday. Which is why Hamilton: The Exhibition” is sure to become the museum-going experience of 2019. It opens April 27 and runs through September 8 for a limited engagement, before going on tour across the country. Here’s what you need to know about this captivating new exhibition.

Rendering by David Korins/Courtesy of “Hamilton: The Exhibition”

The exhibition is housed in a temporary freestanding, 360-degree building on Northerly Island, making it a nice extension off adjoining Museum Campus and also a totally unique immersion. Delving deeper and further than its namesake play, the show explores the life and times of Alexander Hamilton, along with ample Revolutionary history and the founding of the United States.

As guests explore, they can learn more about Hamilton’s early days in trading and his eventual involvement and influence in shaping democracy, leading all the way up to his death in Weehawken, New Jersey. En route, unique lighting installations, sound equipment, music, and artifacts allow visitors to get a sense of what it was like to live during Hamilton’s time. Some particularly striking segments include replicas of New York City in 1776, George Washington’s war tent during the Battle of Yorktown, and a re-creation of the dueling grounds where Hamilton met his end.

Rendering by David Korins/Courtesy of “Hamilton: The Exhibition”

Hamilton’s creator, Lin-Manuel Miranda, narrates the audio guide and serves as cofounder of the installation, along with director Thomas Kail, creative director and set designer David Korins, producer Jeffrey Seller, orchestrator Alex Lacamoire, and historian Joanne Freeman.

Since this type of thing is prime for kids, the exhibition is offering free admission to Chicago public school students in grades 3 and higher. Regular tickets are $39.50 for adults, $32.50 for seniors and military members, and $25 for children ages 4–14.

Learn more—and snag tickets—here.