Art

18 Art Exhibitions You Don’t Want to Miss This Month

Photo courtesy of Hammer Museum

From the first Los Angeles exhibition in 45 years by celebrated African-American artist David Hammons, to a retrospective on polymath from Barbara Stauffacher Solomon, to Internet excavation from art duo Eva and Franco Mattes, to new works from perspectives from around the world, this June is a hot month for cultural exploration. (All shows are on view throughout June unless otherwise specified.)

Photo courtesy of the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo

Florian Maier-Aichen: “The Limits of Control”
New works by experimental photographer Maier-Aichen, in which archetypal landscape images of the American West are re-created using current digital technologies to blur the lines between photography and painting, and those between traditional images of beauty and mass-media reproductions. Opening reception on Saturday, June 1, 6–8 p.m.; through Saturday, July 6; Blum & Poe, 2727 La Cienega Boulevard

Photo courtesy of the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo

Tony Lewis: “Charlatan and Ultimately a Boring Man”
Chicago-based Lewis’s second solo show with Blum & Poe conceptually and formally responds to his main body of work, which analyzes historical and current racism. He pulls much from the white conservative psychology present in the transcript and video documentation of the 1965 debate between William F. Buckley and James Baldwin. Opening reception on Saturday, June 1, 6–8 p.m.; discussion with Lewis and curator Hamza Walker on Saturday, June 29, 2–4 p.m.; Blum & Poe, 2727 La Cienega Boulevard

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Photo courtesy of Jin Shan and Night Gallery

Jin Shan: “Hall of Mirrors”
Shanghai artist Jin Shan’s new sculpture installation comments on historical power structures through references to classic architecture. The Hall of Mirrors and Roman columns serve as a main source of inspiration, though Shan distorts their imagery to reveal current societal changes. Opening reception on Saturday, June 1, 7–10 p.m.; through Saturday, July 13, Night Gallery, 2276 East 16th Street

art exhibits los angeles
Photo courtesy of Wilding Cran Gallery

Stephen Neidich: “Making the rounds (a place to wait)”
Neidich’s first solo show with Wilding Cran features a large mechanical sculpture that is both a performance of chains and shafts and a comment on urbanism. Opening reception on Saturday, June 1, 6–9 p.m.; through Saturday, July 27, Wilding Cran Gallery, 939 South Santa Fe Avenue

María Berrío: “A Cloud’s Roots”
Berrio’s large-scale collaged works depict Surrealist narratives layered with cultural history and biological information of her childhood spent in Colombia’s countryside, a blend of South American mythology and personal memory. Opening Saturday, June 1, 6–8 p.m.; Kohn Gallery, 1227 North Highland Avenue

Francesca Longhini: “Golden Anesthesia”
New paintings by Italian artist Longhini. Formal in nature, the abstract canvases recall traditional Russian Suprematist works. Opening Saturday, June 1, 7–9 p.m.; through Saturday, July 20, Baert Gallery, 2441 Hunter Street

Barbara Stauffacher Solomon: “Relax Into the Invisible”
A survey of works by San Francisco–based artist, graphic designer, landscape architect, and writer Solomon—best known for her supergraphics of the 1960s, her design of the logo, and much of the interior space of Northern California’s utopian coastal project Sea Ranch. Opening reception on Sunday, June 2, 4–7 p.m.; through Saturday, July 27, LAXArt, 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard

art exhibits los angeles
Photo courtesy of Hammer Museum

Sarah Lucas: “Au Naturel”
Influential British artist Lucas’s first U.S. survey. Associated with the group known as the Young British Artists (YBA) that exhibited together in London in the late ’80s, Lucas’s work examines traditional notions of gender, sexuality, and identity. Opening reception on Saturday, June 8, 8–11 p.m.; through Sunday, September 1, Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Boulevard

Erró
With roots in Surrealism, Dada, and Pop Art, this survey of paintings and collages from 1960 to 2018 by European artist Erró contains densely composed works drawing references from historic masters, overlaid with modern commercial consumer images. Opening reception on Saturday, June 8, 6–9 p.m.; through Sunday, July 21, Over the Influence, 833 East 3rd Street

Photo by Ruben Diaz/Courtesy the artists and Commonwealth and Council, Los Angeles.

Alice Könitz: “Display Systems of the Los Angeles Museum of Art”
Könitz presents LAMOA, a retrospective of sorts documenting the art project and exhibition in one. Over the course of roughly four years, 30 artists were invited to exhibit and perform as the space shifted shapes, location, and format. The work functions as a commentary on the expansion and accommodation of large institutions. Through Saturday, June 29; Commonwealth and Council, 3006 West 7th Street #220

Photo by Ruben Diaz/Courtesy the artists and Commonwealth and Council, Los Angeles.

Yukako Ando: “Open Fence”
Ando presents a large sculpture made from security fencing that references personal privacy, identity, and self-imprisonment as decorative elements. Through Saturday, June 29; Commonwealth and Council, 3006 West 7th Street #220

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Photo by Robert Wedemeyer/Courtesy of Rafii Kalenderian and Vielmetter Los Angeles

“Raffi Kalenderian: Memento Vivo”
Los Angeles–based Kalenderian presents new vibrant portraits celebrating environmental context for this fourth solo show with the gallery. Through Saturday, June 29; Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, 6006 Washington Boulevard, Culver City

David Hammons
The first Los Angeles exhibition in 45 years by celebrated African-American artist Hammons, whose sculptures and video-based work offers a critical interpretation of African-American art history. He’s dedicated this work, the largest of his career, to legendary musician Ornette Coleman, founder of free jazz. Freeing himself from conventions of visual art exhibition, Hammons created this installation following his ideas instead of formal expectations. Through Sunday, August 11; Hauser & Wirth, 901 East 3rd Street

weekly events la may 28-june 2 2019
Eva and Franco Mattes, “Data Doubles,” 2019, team (bungalow), Los Angeles. / Photo by Jeff McLane/Courtesy of the artists and team (bungalow)

Eva & Franco Mattes: “Data Doubles”
Artist duo Eva and Franco Mattes present photographs and objects exploring the Internet as a platform for shaping contemporary life and culture. They’ve been tracking the influence of the ’net since its nascent, near-analog days through the present, discarding precious ideas about privacy and ripping open a conversation where the banal meets the contextually sublime. Through Sunday, June 23; Team Bungalow, 306 Windward Avenue, Venice

J. Parker Valentine: “Skin of Paradise”
Valentine presents new drawings and works showcasing her diverse practice, which includes film, photography, sculpture, and text. Her multilayered process unfolds as a limitless ecology of imagery evoking the erotic and the haunted. Through Saturday, July 13; Park View/Paul Soto, 2271 West Washington Boulevard

Photo by Ian Byers­Gamber/Courtesy of the Artist & François Ghebaly/Los Angeles

Genesis Belanger: “Coins for the Ferryman”
Stoneware and porcelain sculptures evoke the human form in a purgatorial dreamscape of postcapitalist crossfire: desire for change and ultimate self-indulgence. Through Saturday, June 15; François Ghebaly, 2245 East Washington Boulevard

Photo courtesy of East Hollywood Fine Art

Geraldo Perez: “The Chicago Paintings”
Chicago-based artist Perez presents recent abstract paintings reflecting his personal history of immigration within the historical references of artists that inspired him. Through Sunday, June 23; East Hollywood Fine Art, 4316 Melrose Avenue

Photo by Ian Byers­Gamber/Courtesy of the Artist & François Ghebaly/Los Angeles

Candice Lin: “Meaningless Squiggles”
A mini survey of Los Angeles–based Lin, examining her recent projects, all connected by a historical focus on migration, control, and contamination through people, plants, and viruses. Through Sunday, June 16; François Ghebaly, 2245 East Washington Boulevard